Glasgow School of Design Silversmithing & Jewellery

Eilidh Fraser (she/her )

Colour, experimental patination techniques, and symbolism of food in art history, most importantly the Pomegranate all feature in this body of work. The Pomegranate has served as a visual, historical, figurative material and source of inspiration in artworks depicting any of the seasons. For example, Pre-Raphaelite, Gabriel Rosetti’s Proserpine (1874), which illustrates the painter’s lover at the time, Jane Morris, is posed with a pomegranate in hand to reference captivity. In classical mythology Proserpine (Roman Goddess of Springtime) was captured by Pluto (the god of Death) to become his wife. Unfortunately, consuming food from the underworld would determine her fate to remain there forever. The Roman Goddess ate six pomegranate seeds, which therefore restricted her to six months of each year spent in Pluto’s kingdom. This analogy of Proserpine has been replicated through Jane Morris’ problematic relationship with her husband William Morris, who had symbolically trapped his wife in marriage and the domestic space. The importance of this in relation to our captive state in the home during the outbreak of Covid19 is a play on material value and use which could play a role in narrating our own release from lockdown. Casting the interior and exterior of this symbolic fruit has captured the essence of transience translating into a permanent state. The hope of new beginnings paired with the uncertainty, loss of control and feelings of vulnerability have all played key roles in this collection. Creating patterns through a range of contrasting surface textures; testing the metal & pomegranate’s capabilities, this collection highlights a deliberately aged appearance of oxidation on metal, to celebrate the release of lockdown with a body of work, which similar to ourselves, has finally been exposed to the elements.

Contact
eilidh.iona.fraser@gmail.com
E.Fraser1@student.gsa.ac.uk
instagram
Works
Patere Collection

Patere Collection

The word ‘Patere‘ originates from Latin, meaning exposed:

to be/lie open

Inspiration & Patination process

Patination technique translated on digitally printed silk

Lantern Earring proposal

outer tube 55mm x30mm inner tube 30mmx20mm

Colour in Metal

Decorative Rust
By simply mirroring an object or design, makes me think of a butterfly: triggering senses of change , rebirth & rejuvenation
digitally printed cotton

Submerged

digitally printed faux silk

Cork-lined, etched copper placemat proposal

Digitally printed patination process on faux silk 0.5mm thick copper sheet 210 x 297 mm
Digitally printed faux silk

Food Patinated copper dish

diameter 100mm height-60mm
digitally printed faux silk
Details of pomegranate patinated copper bowl

Patere Dangly Earrings

Patinated copper, puck welded 1mm silver wire Top component - 40mm x 55mm Middle – 30x30mm Bottom - 20mmx30mm

Patere dangly earrings

Lockdown Loving cup

Photo Etched & pierced, pomegranate patinated copper sheet Height- 150mm circumference of base – 70mm
Dimpled base, crystallisation details
Aiming to capture the naturally occurring patination around me , with natural materials..

Brushstroke Tube Earrings

Patinated Copper , bronze cast wood shavings Dimensions Height- 55mm Width- 30mm
Distorted Copper Frames
Engraved, Food Patinated Copper Dish Diameter 100mm Height-60mm

Captured

Rose gold pin-less Brooch proposal Tension in metal captures fabric
Digitally printed faux silk
Variety of Patinated Copper frames exposed to the elements
Thinking through making

Laid Bare

Solid silver cast pomegranate peel & seeds Bowl 120mmx130mm