Communication Design Glasgow School of Design

Rachel Kate Macleod (she/they)

Research heavy and playfully idea focused, my work focuses on niche and taboo topics that allows the audience to ask questions. Using objects and layout to create narratives, I develop my work from my own and other people’s personal experiences. Being a socially conscious designer, I aim to develop ideas that strive for conversation and bring undiscussed topics to light. I tend to move around a lot with my work, switching from typography, to coding, to photography – this course has allowed me to experiment with all the areas that I’m interested in.

Contact
rachelkatemacleod@gmail.com
r.macleod1@gmail.com
rachelkatemac.com
@rachelkatemac
Projects
Respect the Sabbath Day, Keep it Holy
WIP Show Identity
Mark Kermode’s Worst Films 2020
Tasglann

Respect the Sabbath Day, Keep it Holy

I grew up in a strict, religious household in the Scottish Islands. Sundays were kept sacred – no games, no secularism, only rest. The islands held this tradition high, with shops being closed on the Sabbath and visible chores such as hanging up the washing was frowned upon.

As I’ve grown older and I reflect on this unique upbringing, I think about how it affected me. While I practice keeping Sundays relaxed and free from work, I struggle with religious guilt. The expectation to always be good and repent when I’ve done something wrong weighs like a rough hangover.

I wanted to make work around this to understand it more. I conducted a series of interviews with folk who grew up in the area to hear their sides and how it influenced their lives. I titled this project ‘Respect the Sabbath Day, Keep it Holy’, as while it began an analysis of island culture and its relationship with Sunday, I found there was so much more to uncover. Such as the idea of being told to repent, the idea of remaining celibate until marriage, trying to understand a world with a God when bad things happen everywhere.

With washing clothes on the Sabbath being something the locals frown upon, a solution was made. Unblemished - the pre-blessed laundry tablets made from the Blood of the Lamb! Make your clothes as white as snow with the only detergent suitable for use on a Sunday!
Finally! A karaoke game for young children on the Sabbath! Train your sons to be presenters, and your daughters to be harmonics with the Scottish Psalter on Karaoke. View a clip here: https://vimeo.com/546501267
Who made the world? God did! Using images from TIME's 100 greatest images of 2020, this allows for the viewer to think and remind ourselves of the world around us.
Struggling with celibacy? Why not get married! Marriage courses are common practice, and before you put a ring on it, why not listen to what experienced deacons have to say about it.

WIP Show Identity

Working along side Natalia Witwicka, Maria Pelosi, and Louise Julien, we developed the identity for Communication Design’s annual Work in Progress show. This year it was held entirely online for the first time, which left us with the immensely huge challenge of not only designing an identity for the show, but also building a functioning website. The final website can be viewed here: comdeswip.com/

Mark Kermode’s Worst Films 2020

2020 was a rough year. With the pandemic taking over our daily lives, it was no surprise that the world of cinema had to come to an abrupt stand. The majority of blockbusters were post-poned until 2021, but that didn’t stop others from making their way on streaming platforms. From Netflix originals to small-budget indie movies, film critics had to use what they could get. While some incredible films were released in 2020, many made the year feel even worse. This publication shows Kermode’s least favourite films of 2020, along with his sharp commentary based on each one.

Tasglann

My whole life I have been a collector. When I got a record player a couple years back, my family passed on some Scottish and Gaelic vinyls over to me to play. This included a record by my great uncle Angus, and led me on to gathering music that I felt wasn’t recognised or wildly available online.

Traditional music has a rich background, and I wanted to build and develop an online archive that would reflect this. The site would provide the viewer to transport themselves to where the artist was from, and hear the raw music from the vinyl itself.

This project continues to be built, and will be made public soon.