defying ‘no good spaces’

Using Rights to the City by David Harvey as a theoretical framework, the project lay claim to no good spaces in Singapore. As a summative to the personal project, the project will lay claims on no good spaces and defy against the dictated what can one call their own.

‘What kind of city we want cannot be divorced from the question of what kind of people we want to be.’
david harvey, rights to the city

What if people are given the rights to lay claims and defy against the dictated what can one call their own?

 

In reality, we organisms (humans) seek shelter. Buildings ex- ist as a shelters (homes) but also in our urban landscape as a point we ‘enter’ and ‘leave’. Such relationships of organisms entering and leaving the shelter can be quite monotonous. If we seek to shelter, why are spaces not reordered to suit us.

The desire to lay claims and to defy the dictated should be called by ourselves. Why are we not using such spaces when it is apparent they they are opportuni-ties? The rights to people is when we come to fill in the spaces, on our accord.

To re(order) is to simply arrange something again (or) differently.

RIGHTS TO THE CITY

Spatial inequality was a result of commodification and capitalism; unequal amount of qualities or re- sources depending on the area or location. It is a right to change ourselves by changing the city; thus the intervention. In David Harvey’s concept, establishing democratic management over its urban deployment constitutes the right to the city. Quoting him, ‘What kind of city we want cannot be divorced from the question of what kind of people we want to be.’

PROJECT OVERVIEW

In Kengo Kuma’s Studies in Organics he refers to us humans as ‘organisms’. In my intepretation, we organisms (humans) seek shelter. Buildings exist as a shelters (homes) but also in our urban landscape as a point we ‘enter’ and ‘leave’. Such relationships of organisms entering and leaving the shelter can be quite monotonous. If we seek to shelter, how can our relationship with space be fostered?

set 18

By superimposing the outcomes of project one and two, it display the qualities of the hdb maisonette. In project one, I explored a leftover space that resulted in-between two buildings. In project two, I seek the relationship between nature and space under the bridge through the play of natural occurrences. Project three holds the qualities of both; a narrow corridor space with opportunity for vertical exploration, and a space that is precious and possibly reveals a lot more opportunities, but merely overlooked.

COLLAGE

The collage sums up the ideal intervention to be designed; interstitial spaces in the double volumed corridor, bringing back the familiarity of hdb living.

DEFYING HDB LIVING

By having multiple permutations imposed into the hdb maisonette, it permits us to lay claims and re(order) what is dicated to be called our own. A collage and sticker illustration of the intervention at site gives a kind of reject and repel to what is at present; a sort of overthrow of what is dictated.

INTERIOR 1

Made out of steel mesh, the structure can maintain its shape even with constant input of pressure. the mesh facade can be used as a shade from the harsh natural lights, but also potentially as a habitat for plants to climb. Within the intervention, it allows spontaneous conversations. The topography of the elements is a potential social space, where the walls, parapet and ‘roof’ are dictated by its user.

INTERIOR 2

20mm steel poles in 350mm latticcework pattern formation, it seems to lower down out of the ceiling like a matrix. Like a transparent terrain in the sky, the structure is broken to allow people access as well as to generate different uses around, below and on it. It allows all sort of inhabitations from humans to pets, and anything in-between. A simple cube, scaled to the human body, is repeated to build a form that exists between the organic and the abstract, to create an ambiguous structure that will blur the boundaries between interior and exterior.

INTERIOR 3

This variant is an attempt to challenge the conventional schemes of the domestic spatial design by proposing a scheme that redefines public and private space; its design places an emphasis on the relationships between the public and private spaces. The facade-like unit strategically placed at the side, so they never directly face each other, which create a sense of privacy. There are no walls to mark the transitions between the corridor spaces throughout, creating an interesting dynamic relationship the exterior and interior.

INTERIOR 4

Made from a large translucent fabric, the curtain for the facade covers a ‘window’ of W5 x H4m, giving privacy to the residents with low degree of defiance. The drapery opens like a stage curtain when pulled. This movement changes the quality of light and thus the character of the corridor space. The double volumed space in the corridor can appear like a tower, or a castled private space depending whether the drapery is drawn or open, blurring the boundaries between the outside and inside.